Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorSchaffer, Professor Mark
dc.contributor.advisorChristev, Doctor Atanas
dc.contributor.authorJudson, Vincent
dc.date.accessioned2020-01-17T17:26:46Z
dc.date.available2020-01-17T17:26:46Z
dc.date.issued2018-04
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10399/4091
dc.description.abstractThis work analyses different aspect of migration in between the first two censuses that were conducted in the UK in the twenty-first century. The second chapter examines the factors that can have an effect on the rate at which migrants in England and Wales leave the UK in order to return to their home country during the time period between the census of 2001 and that of 2011. It uses a theory, initially developed by Borjas and Bratsberg (1996), that attempts to explain why individuals from countries outside of the UK may choose to leave the country after their arrival. Leaving may have been pre-planned before the initial migration to the host nation or may be the result of poor outcomes after arrival. It is found that many of the results found by Borjas and Bratsberg (1996) in the United States are replicated in the first decade of the Twenty-first century for the United Kingdom. In the third chapter I investigate the reasons into why there is a wage gap between native and migrant workers in the UK labour market. It provides evidence to show that the gap in wages between the two populations can be linked to the composition of the migrant cohort. It also shows that as the European Union expanded there was a significant change in the discrimination against the migrant from the countries that joined the EU in May 2004 and January 2007.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherSocial Sciencesen
dc.publisherHeriot-Watt Universityen
dc.titleUK migration at the beginning of the 21st centuryen
dc.typeThesisen


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record